ACS Deployments: Alfresco Search Services Zip Distribution

ACS Deployments: Alfresco Search Services Zip Distribution

This course will provide the student with a tutorial on how to install Alfresco Search Services using just the ZIP distribution provided by Alfresco.

About this course

Overview

This course will provide the student with a tutorial on how to install Alfresco Search Services using just the Zip distribution provided by Alfresco. This will be demonstrated using the server or local workstation that was used in a prerequisite course.

This course is for those looking for an alternative to recommended deployment method for ACS and Alfresco Search Services: Docker Containers. The use of Docker Compose or Helm has superseded the installer, which is no longer provided as of ACS v6.0.

This course will not cover the manual installation of the Solr4 or older search subsystems.

What Will I Learn?

  • Alfresco Search Services packages, their contents, and their purposes
  • Installing & configuring Alfresco Search Services dependencies
  • Installing & configuring Alfresco Search Services

Target Audience

  • Administrators

Time Required: ~60 minutes

Applicable Product Versions: 5.1 - 6.1

Difficulty: Intermediate

Prerequisite Knowledge

This course presumes that the student is competent with the following tools, technologies and concepts:

  • ZIP and installer based installations on the target operating system
  • Command line basics for the target operating system

This course also presumes the student has already completed the following course:

This course presumes the student has the same skills and knowledge as they did for the prerequisite course.

Prerequisite Resources

  • A system for the installation (see below)
  • Administrator or root access to that system
  • Access to the Internet to download software dependencies

If you plan to install ACS Enterprise, you will also need the following.

System for Installation

This course requires access to a system for the installation. This system could be a virtual machine (VM), a server procured by the student's organization and made available exclusively to the student, or even the student's local workstation.

There are no instructions on unwinding or uninstalling the work performed in this tutorial. This is why it is recommended that you use a clean system and not your local workstation. You can still do this on your local workstation using a tool like VMWare or the open source VirtualBox. You could technically use Docker too, but this course is geared toward not using containers.

The operating system may be any reasonable distribution of Linux, Apple MacOS, or Microsoft Windows.

You will see references to POSIX throughout this tutorial. POSIX is a standard followed by both Linux and Apple MacOS operating systems. Whenever you see an indentation labeled with POSIX or a specific operating system, those sections and instructions are only for that operating system. You can see one of these sections immediately after this paragraph. And those rules apply to that section too.

POSIX

Package Managers

Most Linux distributions rely on built-in package managers. The most popular ones are apt and yum which use the deb and rpm formats. There is cross-distribution package manager available called Flatpak. There is also a package manager available for both Apple MacOS and Linux distributions called Homebrew. Having one of these tools available is highly recommended. It will assist with the installation of typical dependencies where the version of the software is not as critical as others.

If you are using a POSIX system, you are expected to know how to use your package manager to search for and install software.

Carriage Return

Microsoft Windows uses a carriage return followed by a line feed (CRLF) to mark the end of lines in text files. It is typical for POSIX systems to use just a line feed (LF). Despite these differences, you will find some configuration files use CRLF in their packages for POSIX systems.

It is highly beneficial to have the dos2unix tool. You can install this through your package manager or manually if you are adventurous. This tool will convert lines ending in CRLF to LF. This will allow you to edit files using editors based on vi and nano. You could always use your favorite UI-based editor too.

Curriculum1 Hour

  • Introduction
  • Objectives
  • Prerequisites
  • Initial Resources
  • Lessons
  • Preparation
  • Installation
  • Configuration
  • Startup
  • Conclusion
  • Review
  • References
  • Next Steps
  • Course Survey

About this course

Overview

This course will provide the student with a tutorial on how to install Alfresco Search Services using just the Zip distribution provided by Alfresco. This will be demonstrated using the server or local workstation that was used in a prerequisite course.

This course is for those looking for an alternative to recommended deployment method for ACS and Alfresco Search Services: Docker Containers. The use of Docker Compose or Helm has superseded the installer, which is no longer provided as of ACS v6.0.

This course will not cover the manual installation of the Solr4 or older search subsystems.

What Will I Learn?

  • Alfresco Search Services packages, their contents, and their purposes
  • Installing & configuring Alfresco Search Services dependencies
  • Installing & configuring Alfresco Search Services

Target Audience

  • Administrators

Time Required: ~60 minutes

Applicable Product Versions: 5.1 - 6.1

Difficulty: Intermediate

Prerequisite Knowledge

This course presumes that the student is competent with the following tools, technologies and concepts:

  • ZIP and installer based installations on the target operating system
  • Command line basics for the target operating system

This course also presumes the student has already completed the following course:

This course presumes the student has the same skills and knowledge as they did for the prerequisite course.

Prerequisite Resources

  • A system for the installation (see below)
  • Administrator or root access to that system
  • Access to the Internet to download software dependencies

If you plan to install ACS Enterprise, you will also need the following.

System for Installation

This course requires access to a system for the installation. This system could be a virtual machine (VM), a server procured by the student's organization and made available exclusively to the student, or even the student's local workstation.

There are no instructions on unwinding or uninstalling the work performed in this tutorial. This is why it is recommended that you use a clean system and not your local workstation. You can still do this on your local workstation using a tool like VMWare or the open source VirtualBox. You could technically use Docker too, but this course is geared toward not using containers.

The operating system may be any reasonable distribution of Linux, Apple MacOS, or Microsoft Windows.

You will see references to POSIX throughout this tutorial. POSIX is a standard followed by both Linux and Apple MacOS operating systems. Whenever you see an indentation labeled with POSIX or a specific operating system, those sections and instructions are only for that operating system. You can see one of these sections immediately after this paragraph. And those rules apply to that section too.

POSIX

Package Managers

Most Linux distributions rely on built-in package managers. The most popular ones are apt and yum which use the deb and rpm formats. There is cross-distribution package manager available called Flatpak. There is also a package manager available for both Apple MacOS and Linux distributions called Homebrew. Having one of these tools available is highly recommended. It will assist with the installation of typical dependencies where the version of the software is not as critical as others.

If you are using a POSIX system, you are expected to know how to use your package manager to search for and install software.

Carriage Return

Microsoft Windows uses a carriage return followed by a line feed (CRLF) to mark the end of lines in text files. It is typical for POSIX systems to use just a line feed (LF). Despite these differences, you will find some configuration files use CRLF in their packages for POSIX systems.

It is highly beneficial to have the dos2unix tool. You can install this through your package manager or manually if you are adventurous. This tool will convert lines ending in CRLF to LF. This will allow you to edit files using editors based on vi and nano. You could always use your favorite UI-based editor too.

Curriculum1 Hour

  • Introduction
  • Objectives
  • Prerequisites
  • Initial Resources
  • Lessons
  • Preparation
  • Installation
  • Configuration
  • Startup
  • Conclusion
  • Review
  • References
  • Next Steps
  • Course Survey